Wait... That's no iPhone!

Apple’s reign as America’s most popular cell phone manufacturer has gone unchallenged for too long!

Two years ago, I decided I could no longer live the mainstream life.

Two years ago, I made the dramatic leap from the iPhone 5C to the Android S7.

As I was incompetent when it came to my new phone, there was definitely a little trauma the first couple days, but within a week I had gotten used to it. I had known Apple all my life… had I betrayed a company I loved – most close and dear to me? Or had I simply moved on to a new stage in my life?

I think the answer lies somewhere in-between. You see, this is not your everyday my phone is better than your’s! article – this is a my phone is way better than your’s! article!

Just kidding. In all seriousness, there are things I really like about both. I’ll start with what I like about the iPhone:

iPhone

  • iMessage! I really miss it, especially now with the cool updates (games, drawings, etc.). The most annoying part about not having iMessage is that when I send/receive long texts my phone splits it up into multiple 140 character groups and doesn’t always send them in order! Using WhatsApp solves the problem, but not many people I know have it. :(
  • Emojis: I can’t find out how to get iOS emojis on my phone! It’s really annoying because I can’t always tell the expression of the emojis I’m sending… If I really want to know, I have to type it in WhatsApp (because I can get iOS emojis there) and copy and paste.
  • AirDrop: This would just be useful at school because we have iPads. It’s not really significant though. Email is just a little slower.
  • Simplicity: All Apple products work the same way. They make it very easy to connect other Apple devices. It’s really easy to use most Apple devices if you know how to use one.

Android

  • Adjustability: There are so many more settings and possibilities with an Android. I have multiple pass-code options (PIN, Password, connect-the-dots, knocking, swiping, etc.). I can change the entire layout of my home screen. I can set default apps so it doesn’t ask me the same questions all the time. I could go on, but I think I made my point. I like all the options I have with android, but for some people it’s too complicated.
  • Accessibility: If you have an iPhone, tell me how long it takes to turn on/off location services. You have to go to settings, privacy, then location services to turn it on/off. For me it’s just on the control center which is nice. Also I can open the camera and take pictures without touching the screen at all.
  • Widgets: Weather, speed dial, speed directions (tap and it takes you to a destination) and others. They are available (kind of) on Apple devices but way better on Android.
  • Power saving mode: This is just one feature, but it is so great. I can choose how much I want to save my battery and my phone will estimate how much longer the battery will last. Ultra Power saving mode can add up to two days of battery life!

I like my S7, and I would be totally fine with an iPhone. I intentionally gave each side the same number of advantages. Really, the only reason to switch is to be adventuresome! Spice up your life a little if ya know what I’m sayin!

Disclaimer: This article contains possibly offensive views on a heated topic. Also, this article is totally opinion based. I did no research, but I do have 2+ years experience as an owner of both!


Did this heated opinion article offend you in any way? Do you have any evidence completely disproving everything I just wrote? Are you feeling insecure about life choices? Do you just need some spice advice? If so, just email me at 19370@jcpstudents.org ;)

 

Comments

The Roundup welcomes members of the Jesuit community to post comments that foster respectful and intelligent debate regarding published articles. Comments to published articles will be accepted under the following guidelines:

  1. The author of the comments includes his or her name; no anonymous comments will be published.
  2. The author of the comments is a recognizable member of the Jesuit community.
  3. The author of the comments responds respectfully to the writer, without resorting to personal attack or other invective.