Young and old, healthy and sick, we all have it. Blood is an essential part of the human body, though it’s easy to take it for granted. Unfortunately, the sick are not always able to produce their own blood cells in the quantity or quality necessary for a healthy life, but there are many people in our society willing to donate their own at the price of only the poke of an small metal tube.

On February 15th, the Jesuit Medical Society sponsored the spring blood drive which gave students, faculty and even parents the opportunity to donate their blood to a just cause.

Thankfully, there were plenty of people willing to donate, so the turnout of the event was spectacular. While there were plenty of people willing to give up their blood for the drive, everybody is encouraged to donate. Mr. Von from the Medical Society even thinks that anyone who is eligible should donate at least once: “For everyone who has the opportunity to participate, it’s actually a very personal experience even though you won’t probably ever know the the person who receives your donation.” If the rewarding feeling is not enough motivation to get you donating blood, there were plenty of hot dogs and nachos waiting for those who decided to give.

While donating blood may not be beneficial to you, it is a great way to give back to your community and help someone who is in need. Having a young healthy population is a blessing to be able to share. Who knows? You might end up having a family member who needs blood someday. Mr. Von concluded that “it is a reminder that we need to keep our stores up. If we can help in this small way, we should do so.”

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